2017: Books in Review

Giorgio Vasari
Italian Humanists (Six Tuscan Poets), 1554
Oil on panel

“I am unable to satisfy my thirst for books. And I perhaps own more of them than I ought; but just as in certain other things, so does it happen with books: success in searching for them is a stimulus to greed… Books please inwardly; they speak with us, advise us and join us together with a certain living and penetrating intimacy, nor does this instill only itself into its readers, but it conveys the names and desire for others.”

(Francesco Petrarch, Letters on Familiar Matters III. 18)

Continue reading “2017: Books in Review”

Advertisements

Aristotle for Christian Politics

Raphael
The School of Athens, 1511
Fresco

Especially in American schools of theological discourse, there is a nigh-eternal tension between the terms of Christian doctrine-practice and politics. While the most self-evident practice of such dissonance is visible in the particular relationship of the American Christian Church (taken as a broad unity) and its civil government, the American nation-state — a dissonance that includes both doctrines and practices that are debated from a Christian-politics to a secular-nation-state-politics — I sometimes wonder if our dissonance is even more primal, and thus more problematic, than just discourse.

Continue reading “Aristotle for Christian Politics”