Confession and Moral Reasoning

Ilya Repin
Refusal of the Confession, 1885
Oil on canvas

There is a dearth of moral reasoning in the present-day American culture, not to mention in the Church. It would seem to be the logical consequence of a libertarian ideal of freedom, despite all criticisms to the contrary. Under the hegemonic ideology of our day and age, the notion of asserting some claim or access to moral authority is offensive (at least), outmoded (certainly!), and tyrannical (at worst!). It is from this standpoint, for instance, that Michel Foucault calls the Augustinian practice of confession the modern’s source of self and, thus, their prison under the regime of biopower (since biopower undergirds and advances an ideological value of subjectification, etc.). This thesis, one of the central pieces of his The History of Sexuality, is questionable to me. Continue reading “Confession and Moral Reasoning”


Idols: An Introduction

Nicolas Poussin
The Adoration of the Golden Calf, 1634
Oil on canvas

The precise understanding of what constitutes an idol has been a matter of intense discussion for a long time. For some, an idol is any image that represents or stands on the behalf of God or gods. For others, for instance most modern evangelicals, an idol is any thing (broadly considered) that replaces or supplants the Lord God in a hierarchy of values, beliefs, or desires. Still others hold more nuanced views, such that the Eastern Orthodox do not hold icons of Christ to be either idols or transgressions of the Second Commandment, while most Presbyterians, on the other hand, would hold that images of Christ are transgressions of that commandment and, thus, also idols.

Continue reading “Idols: An Introduction”